Sales

Home/Sales
15 01, 2018

TAKE A LEAP, SOMEONE WILL CATCH YOU!

By |2018-04-14T20:18:03-05:00January 15th, 2018|Categories: Blog, Motivation, Sales, Sales strategies, Your Brain|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , |0 Comments

Share This:

“Want to Take a Leap?” Elle Gibson

It’s great knowing everything isn’t it? Sure it is, you’ve spent your whole life becoming the expert.

YES, I’M TALKING ABOUT YOU AND ME. THIS WEEK I LEARNED SOMETHING NEW! LET ME EXPLAIN MY THOUGHTS.

Once you feel you’ve mastered something, like being the expert on your job or in a sport, it gives you a good feeling. People call you for advice and want your ‘opinion.’ Did you ever think that being an expert isn’t all it’s cut out to be? Are you getting  tired of the phone calls?

Did you ever think that being an expert has a downside?  I’ve spent most of my adult life trying to become an expert on certain things. In my mind, if I’m not an expert, why would you hire me?

(The NLRB delivers a big kick in the pants to employers)

THIS WEEK I FOUND OUT I’M WRONG. SOMEONE SAID I GAVE THEM A ‘GOOD KICK IN THE PANTS,’ AND THEY LEARNED SOMETHING NEW. WOW. I GUESS THAT’S WHAT YOU’RE AFTER.

When we become experts, we develop patterns of behaviors that make life easier. Patterns we can replay whenever we need to. We rely on them to guide us so that we always get the same results.

I suggested to my friend that we drove a different way to the mall. Not only did she get upset, she got damn angry with me.

“I like everything the same she said, I’m trying to simplify my life and not have any surprises that will throw me off track.”

In my mind, that meant the track to boredom; I didn’t say anything, I kept driving. Just to give you some more insight, she takes a lot of antidepressant medications; I don’t have to tell you why do I?

What would happen if you practiced trying to be a non-expert? Suppose I told you it would make you more creative, less ‘stuck’ and possibly happier—what would you think?

I was listening to an interesting podcast on Masters of Scale, hosted by LinkedIn Co-Founder and Greylock Partner, Reid Hoffman. Those of you that have spoken to me know I’m enamored’ to “Masters of Scale” and it’s how motivate myself. The podcasts are all centered on people that have taken major leaps to try something new. Their leaps are based on ‘hunches,’ or ‘where the world is going,’ and then getting on a new bandwagon. Most of the people are experts in something but are bored being experts and knowing everything. They are looking for a new bandwagon.

I KNOW WHAT YOU’RE THINKING; IF I HAD ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD I WOULD LOOK FOR A NEW BANDWAGON TOO. OH REALLY?

WHY? BECAUSE THEY ARE CURIOUS AND LIKE LEARNING NEW THINGS?

I’m no different than you; I’ve spent 20 years becoming the expert. I’m finding it isn’t what it’s cut out to be.

I’M A LITTLE BORED! WHAT ABOUT YOU?

Being the expert is a great skill; it means we don’t need to re-learn every time we encounter something or someone we don’t know. We have developed patterns of behavior which we can re-play whenever we need to. We rely on our previous patterns of behavior to guide us, which often means we experience the same results.

We spend our whole lives trying to become experts on what we do and what we know. We see ourselves and strive at being the ‘best’ in their profession.

THERE’S NOTHING WRONG WITH THAT IS THERE? ACTUALLY, THERE IS.

When you continually hone your skills, you shut out everything else that threatens them. Consider the salesperson who thinks if he knows everything about (let’s say carpet) he doesn’t want to hear about any other products or what’s happening in the ‘tile’ side of things. He’s also not interested in learning new sales tips or anything about ‘customer touch points.’ All he knows is everything that happens in the store with customers, he has it ‘down pat.’

THIS WEEK I’VE DECIDED I WILL READ BEFORE I GO TO BED—NO MORE TV.

I WILL LISTEN TO PODCASTS WHEN I’M ON THE TREADMILL—NO MORE TV. SURE TV IS EASY; I GET TO LIVE IN SOMEONE ELSE’S WORLD, TAKE ON THEIR PERSONALITIES AND SHARE THEIR EMOTIONS.

I’M FIVE DAYS INTO MY NEW WORLD, AND IT’S INTERESTING. I HAVE TO THINK ABOUT ME.

I KNOW WHAT YOU’RE THINKING; IF YOU HAD GIZZILION DOLLARS YOU WOULD DO SOMETHING ELSE TOO. REALLY?

You really don’t need all the money in the world; you just need to test ‘not being the expert.’ Try a sport you’re not good at, listen to a different podcast, learn a new language. Put yourself in an uncomfortable place—not to worry, you can always go back to the safe “expert” place.

“Don’t just sit idle, learn something new everyday”

Visit MastersofScale.com to get a copy of the transcript of this broadcast.

#gettingmotivated #learningsomethingnew #takingaleap #learningnewthings #learning #Mastersofscale #beingtheexpert #founderofLinkedIn #Greylockpartner #TakealeapElleGibson #womenoflife#Lisbethcalandrino#Redhotcustomerservice#fabulousfloorsmagazine

Share This:
30 11, 2015

11 Traits the new Salesperson Must Possess to be Successful

By |2017-03-03T12:06:49-05:00November 30th, 2015|Categories: Blog, Sales, Success|Tags: , , , , , , , , |0 Comments

Share This:
Today's salesperson.

Today’s salesperson.

Over the holidays I usually work for an event company demonstrating their product. I do this because it gives me an opportunity to keep in touch with the customers. I also get to talk with them about everything, including life. It’s interesting what people will tell you about themselves and their shopping habits.

Many businesses are still behind the “electronic eight ball” when it comes to their salespeople. The salespeople and the managers are still functioning like it was the 90’s. Although no more than 10-15 years ago, the world has changed dramatically since then. There are somethings that have remained the same; the salesperson still has to build rapport, overcome objections and close the customer. How it gets done has drastically changed. Customers are influencing each other when it comes to where they shop and what they buy. The customer is either “with us or against us.”

The salesperson is now an integral part of the marketing plan. More than ever the salesperson is not just closing the customer, but need to be driving the customer into the store. Here is what’s changed and how the salesperson can become a driving force to bring customers into the store.

I believe this is the profile of the new salesperson:

  1. Web savvy and can show the customer around your web site. Also knows how to link to your Pinterest, Houzz and Instagram photos. Has also created some YouTube videos for you about products.
  2. Understands how social media works and posts updates of customers and their products.
  3. Seeks affirmations and testimonials for customers for your web site. Is not shy about asking for referrals online. Also pays attention to your online reputation.
  4. Has an up-to-date LinkedIn profile with over 500 connections. Knows how to link up with businesses to expand his/her network.
  5. Is consistent in online postings. Posts weekly if not daily about products and new jobs.
  6. Has a smart phone and is capable of taking photos and posting. Can also show customers how to post online and “like and follow” your business on Facebook.
  7. Understands the value of Houzz and how it can help bring in more customers.
  8. Knows how to put together an event at your business as well as build the invitation online. Understand how online “meetups” can help you build a customer base.
  9. Understands that “tweeting” is not just for the birds. Tweets regularly and has a following.
  10. If he/she doesn’t already have a blog, is considering one to help build a “personal” brand.

Most important can help you figure out why your IPhone won’t turn off. Every business needs people with technology skills. Let’s face it, change starts from the top; the salesperson can’t do it alone.

Thanks to “In search of sociable salespeople,”  for the photo.

Share This:
16 11, 2015

Are You Looking For More Retail Business? Why Not “Cold Call?”

By |2017-03-03T12:06:49-05:00November 16th, 2015|Categories: Blog, Sales|Tags: , , , , , |0 Comments

Share This:
There's no such thing as cold calling.

There’s no such thing as cold calling.

It seems that all areas throughout the country are different; retail business is up or retail business is down. What seems to be steady around the country is that businesses that are out “looking” for business are thriving. We are talking about business that doesn’t come through your door from advertising.

 

Of course, you’re uncomfortable calling on people you don’t know especially if you’ve never done it before. However, maybe you do know them or someone they know. First, you have to know who to call on, so why not start with a brain storming session?

 

 

Who wants to cold call?

Who wants to cold call?

Whenever “looking” for business outside the store comes up so does a look of horror on the faces of most salespeople. Somehow they equate this with stopping complete strangers on the street and asking them to buy products. The success of outside business is to understand that there is no such thing as a cold call. The only people that make real cold calls are telemarketers. The good ones are able to make a connection with you in about 30 seconds.

 

The other day I answered the phone and the voice identifies himself from Time Life. Before I can hang up, he asks me if I like the DVD’s I bought three months ago. They were the best 10 years of Saturday Night Live. I told him they were great, and then he asks me which ones I like the best. Before we’re done, we’re both laughing. Next he’s trying to sell me another product.

 

I began to like him, but I told him that I didn’t think I wanted his next product. He was quite persistent asking me lots of questions. Didn’t I think the quality would be as good, didn’t I like what I got, didn’t I have hours of enjoyment?

 

Guess what? I bought them. I knew the product was good, and I received the CD’s immediately.

 

The same components that make a retail sale successful are identical to the ones for a cold call.

 

A few weeks ago, I was doing a training session, and one of the salespeople was trying to “match a product and price” for his church. I asked him, how long he had been going to the church; it was over 10 years. He also was an elder of the church but was sure his competitor had been in with a product he didn’t have. He was also convinced the price was cheap. My question, why didn’t he know the church needed flooring? He said he felt uncomfortable discussing business with the church members.

 

First thing, remember you are a pro, but maybe you need to retrain yourself and the skills that you already have. You just need to be more competitive and more organized. Why not check with everyone you know if they need your product? If they don’t know you have a product they can’t buy from you. Let everyone you know what you do for a living.

 

Forget the cold calling syndrome; it’s a thing of the past and the people who are successful at getting outside business don’t cold call; they find out everything they can about the customer before they call on them.  Just think the whole city belongs to you if you start networking with whom you know.

 

 

Remember profitable customers are being called on by every smart salesperson so you’re up against the pros.

 

The competition is out there trying to get the business. Some of these relationships go way back or maybe the business was just handed down but don’t give up.

 

Remember the old adage, consistency is better than good salesmanship but consistency takes focus, a ‘never give up’ attitude.

Share This:
3 09, 2015

7 Lies Customers Tell and How You Can Still Sell Them

By |2017-03-03T12:06:52-05:00September 3rd, 2015|Categories: Blog, Building relationships, Customer Satisfaction, Sales, Selling on price|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

Share This:
Liar, liar pants on fire.

Liar, liar pants on fire.

Even seasoned professionals get taken in by customers who use statements to put them off. Rather than take it up with the customer they just give up.

Customer can bend the truth, especially if they haven’t made up their mind about buying. They will say just about anything to get out of the store. As a salesperson, if you’ve done your best, there is no reason to back off from the customer.

START BY NOT BELIEVING THE CUSTOMER’S EXCUSES! If you believe them, it’s over. If you believe them you do not believe in yourself or your business. 

Here are 7 standard customer lies and ideas for selling them.

  1. I can’t afford it. Now we all have had times when we couldn’t afford something; that doesn’t mean we didn’t buy it!

If you’ve explained the value of your product and how it will help the customer, they should be able to see that living without it would be a mistake. Ignore the statement and review the customer’s “conditions of satisfaction.” Give them the features and benefits that fit the customer’s key concerns. You can also suggest a product that is less money and explain the comparison. The customer may don’t let the customer scare you. Your job is to make them feel you have their best interest at heart, and your product is what they need.

  1. We’re just looking.” You’ve heard this a million times and you might be tempted to leave them alone. My suggestion, don’t.

Yes, people just look but if you leave them alone while they’re looking you run the risk of looking like you don’t care. Statements like, “We have some new products, and can I point them out to you?

“We have a huge store; can I help you find the right products?

These statements should be followed up with rapport building statements; anything other than trying to sell them. Talk about their kids, the weather or their smart phone.

3.”I have to ask my husband or my wife.”

One reason the customer might say this is because she or he doesn’t trust your judgment. If they don’t believe what you’re saying, they certainly don’t want to make the decision alone.  It may be true that they aren’t the decision maker so “nicely” review two or three benefits that fit their situation and be quiet.”

  1. “We weren’t prepared to buy; we have to look around.”

Don’t be afraid to tell them you understand, but you don’t want them to lose out on the product or pricing. Before they look around suggest that you review your product with them. Check out what they said about their situation and explain how your product fits the bill.

  1. I’ll know it when I see it.”

This is really a funny statement. If you ask them what it will look like they won’t be able to tell you. They may say you don’t have it. This is a good time to ask them to describe the perfect product to you. If you can get them to talk about it, you will probably come up with new ideas.

  1. It’s too expensive.”

This is a wonderful statement and gives you lots to work with. Review their budget with them and review how the product will work for them. This is similar, to “I can’t afford it.”

  1. “Your competition is cheaper.”

Your competition might be cheaper but are they as nice as you? In other words, building rapport and showing you care is more important than ever. Explain what makes you different and what you’re willing to do for them. Cheaper doesn’t always mean better even if it’s the same product.

What special treats do you have for your customers? A comfortable showroom, an interactive web site that really helps the customer finds the right products. Plenty of social media chatter that shows that customer’s trusts you. You might familiarize yourself with your customer’s online reputation.

How about this? A print out coupon they can only get on their smart phone while they’re in your store.  If you have “wiggle” room, make sure it sounds legitimate. It might do the trick.

Once you’re done, don’t forget to ask the customer  what she thinks about what you’ve said.  This is an easy closing statement that is overlooked by most salespeople.

Lisbeth has been doing sales and customer service training for over 20 years. Reach her at Lcalandrino@nycap.rr.com.

Share This: