Will Your Salespeople Make The Cut?

26 March 2014 Categories: Blog

Salesperson must be knowledgeable about people.

The new millennium has brought numerous changes that are affecting your business and your sales. Many of these we could have never predicted, which makes them even more intrusive. We have entered a new age of selling and a way to do business. Selling, marketing and buying seem to have melded together. What used to be our competitive advantages are slowly eradicating making businesses vulnerable.
With change comes conflict and opportunity. For global organizations this will continue to intensify and shrink as markets get larger.
If your’ organization is engaged in sales, and who isn’t, these changes will call for an overhaul of your sales force and their duties. Those stores that make the cut will survive those that don’t will fall behind their competitors and eventually fall off the radar screen. In order to make changes in your selling system, here are some trends that simply can’t be ignored.
# 1. Never forget that customers are smarter than ever.
This is the age of the customer not the age of technology. The consumer has disrupted how we do business and how they want to relate to your salesperson. By the time the customer gets to your store, she is more than 50% though the buying process and has a pretty good idea how to solve her own problem. This means your selling system has to change.

#2. Selling is quicker than ever.
This is because consumer’s expectations are increasing and out of hand. If your business can’t keep up the pace, you’re off the grid. Customers know about new products and what’s changing in your world. Your job is to keep up and learn more—quickly.
#3. It’s becoming impossible to have the better mousetrap.
We used to talk about competitive advantage; it’s harder than ever to keep one for very long. Instead, your company needs to be imaginative.

According to Peggy Noonan in a 2011 Forbes Article, “Why Businesses Die“, she notes that half a century ago the life expectancy of a firm in the Fortune 500 was around 75 years. Now it’s less than 15 years and declining even further. How long do brilliant ideas last? About 15 nano seconds!

#4. Look out, generation Y is on the move.
By 2025, the majority of the workforce will be these tech-savvy workers who not only think differently than your veteran sales force but interact differently. Combining them with your present workforce will present challenges. Training will be more important than ever especially team building for this inharmonious grouping.

Consider scheduling some team building.
#5 Start planning to make your business a destination, or you will be history.
Shopping is not what is used to be; by 2025, 50 % of the malls will be closed. Only those that come up with a new reason to exist will make it. Jose de Jesus Legaspi and his Plaza Fiesta Malls has changed the malls into a destination for Hispanic families. His malls contain great food, doctors and dental services and entertainment.
How will you make it? Future success will be predicated on rethinking how your organization functions—and making serious changes. Some of these changes will have to be radical. Over the next few weeks, I will talk about what might be on the horizon for you.

Lisbeth Calandrino helps business build Loyal Customers through Customer Retention Sales and Marketing. To have her speak at your business, call her at 518.495.5380, EST.

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3 Things You Can Do To Improve Employee Customer Engagement

19 March 2014 Categories: Blog, Customer Retention Strategies

Customer engagement is all about deepening your relationship with your current customers and establishing new, high-value customer relationships.

Remember the Carnival cruise ship Triumph? If I were a crew member, I’d probably also flip out, though the crew of the Carnival Triumph has been praised in the media and by guests, for remaining attentive, friendly, and professional.  This is not something you might expect from a massively diverse group of underpaid and standard overworked employees. How did it happen? It happened because the crew was engaged and understood the Disney mission.

An often-cited Gallup study from 2011 showed that only 30 percent of U.S. workers employed full- or part-time are engaged in their work and workplace, while approximately half is not engaged. Nearly one in five was actively disengaged. What does this really mean?

Your salespeople are on overdrive and not really engaged with their customers. How do you know? They don’t ask for emails, send customers thank-you notes,  or follow through with customers who don’t buy.  If you have a type of loyalty program, they don’t take the time to explain it to the customer or don’t know how it works. Remember 85% of your business comes from referrals so everyone in your store is important. Referrals don’t just come from past buyers. They come from anyone who has been in your store and had a great experience. How many times have you been in a store, unhappy about the salesperson and then tell your friends, “Don’t go there.”

Everyone who is connected to your business is part of your brand promotion and connected to your customer’s loyalty. Often times these front line people are in the lower pay bands and may not be very happy with their jobs. Their attitude is carried over to your customers. I say your customers because this group doesn’t see them as “their” customers.

In an interview with LoyaltyTruth, Paul Hebert, a lead consultant with Symbolist and an expert in the behavioral arts and employee engagement, believes it’s unrealistic to aim for fully engaged staffs, but feels stores should “begin measuring — with whatever tool you find helpful — and then start working to move the needle.”

Instead of trying to constantly “engage” employees, first you must find out why they are “disengaged.” If you’re not sure what’s going on in your store, have someone “mystery shop” the areas where customers have the most contact. Salespeople are one part, but in their case, niceness pays off. Most stores have many employees aren’t paid for being nice; they get paid for doing their job. There’s a difference.

In order to be engaged with customers, employees need to understand how it works and the payoff to the company.  If you want better engagement, here are a few things to consider.

  1. Reward employees who show make exception contributions to your customers. Things like saying “please” and “thank you, ” and offering to do something extra for the customer like carry a package to the customer’s car.
  2. Build job structures for all employees and a career ladder. Many companies consider some jobs “dead-end” in their business, so they assume people are going to quit. If they were smart, they would realize that an employee, who does their job successful and considers their job important, is a candidate for a job promotion. It’s hard to judge honest with a new employee; it’s easier if one has “shown” loyalty.
  3. 3.    Teach employees new job skills. Job skills can be taught to most people; why not teach them to people who have a good track record with you. This will improve their self-esteem and make them better at their job.

 

Helping employees understand how to engage drive’s results to your bottom line.

Lisbeth Calandrino develops training programs that teaches employees how to provide better engagement with their customers. She can be reached at 518.495.5380 or Lcalandrino@nycap.rr.com.

 

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The Devil is in the Details

08 March 2014 Categories: Customer Satisfaction

Every little thing matters.

Customers are the foundation of any business. With customer satisfaction, more often than not, it’s the smallest details that make the biggest difference. There’s an old saying, “The Devil is in the details.” What better place to see the truth of that statement than in the way a business interacts with its customers?

Here are a few stories to help illustrate the point that it’s the little details that really make a lasting impression in a customer’s mind. And that impression, even if it doesn’t result in an immediate sell, can lead to valuable referrals.

Friendly Help at the Airport

In mid-December 2002, Uncle Sam had me on a plane headed for Japan. I left the American landscape – square, expansive fields, straight lines, and uniformity – and flew off into the unknown. After more than ten hours of flight, the massive plane dipped below the clouds, revealing a landscape full of mountainous, tiered farmland; rice fields; and a multitude of irregularly shaped plots of land.

My first real customer service interaction there was in the airport, where a group of five flight attendants patiently endured my attempts at communicating – I essentially butchered their language – as they tried to assist. If they were annoyed, it didn’t show. They seemed more grateful that I was trying than irritated with my ineptitude.

Let’s contrast this with my experience at the airport when I returned to the U.S. a few months later. Jet-lagged, craving a cigarette, and too tired to navigate on my own, I asked the nearest staff member where the bathroom was. He pointed to the sign, adding a polite “What, you can’t f***ing read?” Now that’s what I call good old U.S. customer service. It’s those “little things” that count.

A Warm Welcome at the Seven-Eleven

If you ever have the opportunity to travel to Japan, one thing you’ll surely notice is the reaction of the employees at nearly any establishment you walk into. As you enter, the people behind the counter all say “Irasshaimase!”, which can be loosely translated as “Welcome!”

At first, it’s a little startling, and maybe a bit odd, but think about it. What better way to make customers feel welcomed than literally yelling “Welcome!” at the top of your lungs when they walk through your doors?

Five years of living there and that warm-and-fuzzy feeling never wore off. The point here isn’t to say that American businesses should do exactly the same. It is, however, to say that it doesn’t take much effort to find simple ways to make your customers feel welcomed and important.

In closing, here are three tips to improve your customer service practices:

  • Be friendly. Sometimes the best customer service is as simple as just being nice to your customer.
  • Show your appreciation. Without their business, you would be out of yours, so thank them for it.
  • Don’t rush. Take the time to show you truly care about his or her needs. Customers don’t enjoy feeling like they’re on an assembly line.

Created by James Allen, james.r.allen2011@gmail.com

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“Skyrocket Your Profits With Stellar Customer Service!”

04 March 2014 Categories: Blog

Customer Service can make you money.

It’s been a long time since I’ve done a telecast but when Jim Armstrong called me I couldn’t refuse. Jim is a columnist for Floor Covering News and specializes in turn-key marketing strategies for flooring dealers.

Customer service used to be kind of boring; now it’s connected to sales and marketing! It can actually improve your bottom line. By the way, the telecast is free.

Do you realize that customer service can make you money? The old customer service department was  like the principal’s office. You went there when things were bad! Now customer service is more interactive and can actually make customers love you you–if you do it right. Customer service is also linked to social media. If you don’t handle your online problems you might become a star on Twitter.

For more about the event and the times, connect to this link,http://jimarmstrongevent.com/lisbeth . The date is March 10, 2014.

 

Lisbeth Calandrino has been coaching executives and designing sales and customer service training programs for over 20 years. She can be reached at Lcalandrino@nycap.rr.com.

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Most Salespeople Can Sell Anything to Anybody at Least Once

02 March 2014 Categories: Blog, Sales

The “one hit wonders” It isn’t in your client’s best interest to chase you down, it is in your best interest to follow up with them regularly.

We all know the “one-hit wonders. They sell the customer and then disappear.  Their paperwork is a mess, and they want nothing to do with the follow-up. Often times they are great salespeople and businesses depend on them. I had a business owner ask me what he should do with his best salesperson. The salesperson could sell anyone but after that he was nothing but trouble. He made mistakes in his estimates, and his paperwork was all over the place. The owner didn’t want to get rid of him because he brought in so much business, but everyone had to clean up after him.

I suggested he explain to the person how much it was costing them to do his follow through.  Why not use part of his commission to pay for an assistant, (he was that good), and then he could do what he did best, sell.  He decided to “clean up his act’ because he didn’t want anyone to have any of his money.

One hit wonders,  razzle/ dazzle the customer and go on to the next one.  To them, the only customer who is important to them is “the new one; “follow-through is not their strong point. This salesperson, likes the excitement of “capturing” an unknown customer. To them when it’s over, it’s over. It’s the hunt that they like.

Unfortunately, your ability to follow through and keep in touch with your sold customer will determine whether you get a referral. Referrals are the lifeblood of any business and 85% of your new customers will come from referrals. If you disappear after you sell the customer, where will you get your referrals?

I’ve been a salesperson my whole life; I understand the “thrill of the hunt.” When I was in the flooring business, I went from retail to the commercial end of the business. I loved growing the commercial business. The profits were bigger; the customers were more complex, and I had to work hard on building relationships and “stealing” customers. I gave up retail selling because the retail customers all seemed the same.   Follow-up was key and referrals within a company came from doing a good job. When I was writing my book on Commercial Flooring (which is out of print) I interviewed Donald LaDuke, the original  owner of Barry, Bette, LeDuke, from Albany, New York. I asked Donald what made a good subcontractor and Donald replied, “One that I’ve never heard of!” In other words, this was someone who did their work and didn’t cause a problem.

Here are three things you can do to build great follow through.

Remind yourself how valuable your customer is and how they will help you build your “personal” business.” Come up with a strategy for staying in touch after the sale.

Find out what makes each customer unique. Then decide how you can continue to build the relationship. It may be their field of business or their community connections.

Work hard at maintaining your connections. It will be easy with some customers and more difficult with others. Once they’re sold ask how you can stay in touch on line through social media or through emails. All of this has to do with two skills that I wrote about on the Albany Times Union: Communication and Connections.

Lisbeth has been helping businesses build retail strategies for over 20 years. To have her speak to your staff or develop a sales/customer service  training program, she can be reached at Lcalandrino@nycap.rr.com.

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Are Your Salespeople Missing in Action?

16 February 2014 Categories: Blog, Customer Service

Sales people must always be on alert for new customers.

The client’s journey begins long before they set foot in a retail store. They are talking with friends, researching products, and looking for testimonials, all before they determine which store to shop. What’s missing? The salesperson.

 

Most stores are  having their salespeople sit around and wait for the client to come into the store.  The customer is in command. This used to work but these days the customer is in control.

 

Why would you want your salesperson to sit around and wait when they can be influencing clients to come into the store? Why are they waiting for the customer to make the decision when they have the opportunity to influence their decision? Why not have them be proactive and go online connecting with the “potential customer?”

 

I know that many business owners are concerned about what their salespeople will say online. Will they insult the customer? Will they be unprofessional? What will be the outcome of their conversation? If this is your concern set some parameters.

But people still buy from people they like and trust. Technology has changed our lives, but it offers the opportunity to for the consumer and salesperson to build their relationship online. The salesperson had to wait until the consumer came into their store to get to know them.  Now they have tremendous opportunities to build important relationships.

If your salespeople could connect with potential customers before they even walk through the door, you would have an advantage over everyone else in the business.

Google (check out this video)  suggests to connect effectively, you must know who your customers are, where they are “hanging out”  and what you’re going to say to them when you find them .

Who knows your customers better than your salespeople?

So it just comes down to what they’ll say. This is a matter of training and policy. Ignoring the potential pitfalls of online communication doesn’t make them go away,it just provides another challenge. A challenge that can be easily managed.   Why not determine the parameters  and dynamics of your salespeople’s conversation? Train them in how to market themselves and the business. This way you can  humanize your marketing, and make your salespeople more attractive to new customers.

The internet is about building relationships; start building yours.

 

These days, a good salesperson has to be a good marketer – there are those of us who think marketing has replaced sales. They must also understand their customer and always be “customer service focused.” Connecting on line is “great” customer service.

 

Social media is not going away nor will customers decide to stop making the Internet their first stop in determining where to shop. The sooner you determine your online policies and how you’re going to have your salespeople connect, the quicker you will increase your customer base.

Lisbeth Calandrino has been doing sales and customer service training for over 20 years. She believes that technology is the key to doing business and salespeople need to be marking and connecting with customers before they come into your place of business. For training or a consultation on the “new selling,” Lisbeth can be reached at Lcalandrino@nycap.rr.com.

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Do you Know What 4 Skills Will Make Your Company Effective?

10 February 2014 Categories: Blog

Hold people accountable for their learning.

I’ve been doing training for twenty five years, and I’m always a bit astounded at the reaction I get when I ask companies what changes they want to see and how they will measure them. This question seems to bring silence to the room.

Why invest in anything that doesn’t bring a return? If you were buying products, and they didn’t sell, you would stop buying them, right? If your advertising wasn’t working, you would stop that also. But I think businesses don’t know how to tell whether their training is working. Maybe they also don’t know what will make a difference or how to measure it? Here is some additional information on training effectiveness.

As a trainer, I want to be part of your success. I realize if I can’t make changes, then I won’t be invited back. The outcome of training should be a measurable change in job performance. The only way this will happen is if the skills are identified and broken down into measurable steps.

I start by determining what the client needs so a program can be developed.  I examine task directives and break them down into “workable chunks.”  If you want to improve sales, I would look at the parts of the sale: opening, building rapport and closing the sale. I would also measure your sales before the training and after the training.

Many businesses don’t measure. But without measuring, we never know if we’re improving.

What skills should your training focus on?

1. Focus on training the core skills that have the most impact on your business. If you want to improve sales, then define the sales process and train. After the training, managers need to follow through so they can hold the salespeople accountable for their new learning.

2. Define exactly what you need. If you want your own online specialized training  but don’t want to teach it, determine what you  need and hire someone to develop your training, including short videos and workbooks. Make them specific so everyone will benefit. Not sure exactly what you need, then define what you would like the training to accomplish.  For example, ( “I want my employees to be better at closing.”)

3. Also, tap into the expertise of your experienced workers. Before they retire, have them write about their jobs. They probably know exactly what skills a person needs to be successful.

4. Cross-train and analyze the skills of existing employees. Employees who know how to do more than one job are more valuable than the proverbial “one-trick pony.” You also might discover employees who have more skills than you thought!

Add communication and personal skills training. Who can’t benefit from improved communication, getting organized or better morale?

Make training fun. That can enhance the overall l experience for those who have been required to attend the event. Lots of interactions will  create dynamic training sessions that people will actually remember.

Lisbeth creates customized training that will impact your bottom line. If you want to know if she’s right for your company, Lisbeth can be reached at Lcalandrino@nycap.rr.com or 518.495.5380.

 

 

 

 

I’ve been doing training for five years, and I’m always a bit astounded at the reaction I get when I ask companies what changes they want to see and how they will measure them. This question seems to bring silence to the room.

Why invest in anything that doesn’t bring a return? If you were buying products, and they didn’t sell, you would stop buying them, right? If your advertising wasn’t working, you would stop that also. But I think businesses don’t know how to tell whether their training is working.

As a trainer, I want to be part of your success. I realize if I can’t make changes, then I won’t be invited back. The outcome of training should be a measurable change in job performance. The only way this will happen is if the skills are identified and broken down into measurable steps.

I start by determining what the client needs so a program can be developed.  I examine task directives and break them down into “workable chunks.”  If you want to improve sales, I would look at the parts of the sale: opening, building rapport and closing the sale. I would also measure your sales before the training and after the training.

Many businesses don’t measure. But without measuring, we never know if we’re improving.

What skills should your training focus on?

Focus on training the core skills that have the most impact on your business. If you want to improve sales, then define the sales process and train. After the training, managers need to follow through so they can hold the salespeople accountable for their new learning.

If you want your own online specialized training but don’t want to teach it, define what you need and hire someone to develop your training, including short videos and workbooks. Make them specific so everyone will benefit.

Also, tap into the expertise of your experienced workers. Before they retire, have them write about their jobs.

Cross-train and analyze the skills of existing employees. Employees who know how to do more than one job are more valuable than the proverbial “one-trick pony.” You also might discover employees who have more skills than you thought!

Add communication and personal skills training. Who can’t benefit from improved communication, getting organized or better morale?

Make training fun. That can enhance the overall l experience for those who have been required to attend the event. Lots of interactions will  create dynamic training sessions that people will actually remember.

Lisbeth creates customized training that will impact your bottom line. If you want to know if she’s right for your company, Lisbeth can be reached at Lcalandrino@nycap.rr.com or 518.495.5380.

 

 

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Are You Keeping Your Promises To Your Customers?

03 February 2014 Categories: Blog, Customer Service

I’ve bought a number of valuable items from Brighton, including a belt and a watch with the darling heart symbol. Their products are not cheap; in fact I would say they border on expensive. But with a “lifetime warranty,” so they say, why not buy their products? I can give you at least one reason: they really don’t mean your lifetime, they mean their lifetime.

My belt is worn and I need to replace the band on my watch, so I contacted the company. They guarantee that their products will last and promise to repair them, so this should have been no problem.

But the company said my watch and belt had been discontinued. It could not be repaired.

What happened to the life-time warranty? I don’t remember seeing any disclaimer. I might just as well buy junk or “look alike” Brighton, and discard it when it looks bad. This way I can afford to buy a new one.

Contrast this to a Louis Vuitton satchel I purchase from Bloomingdale’s 20 years ago. It has been repaired so many times I’m embarrassed to send it back. I wasn’t looking for it to be done free; I just wanted it done. I believe the bag cost $250 but I never thought they would continue to repair it. Now that’s a warranty!

Other companies don’t seem to even think about what they’re promising. An offer at a local dry cleaner got me to walk in the door – but their customer service had me walking right back out. Customer service begins when you keep your promises.  (Check out this article on customer service.)

Are you keeping your promises?

The sign in the window said: shirts washed and starched for ninety nine cents if you bring in a piece of dry cleaning. I thought it was a terrific idea so I took two items and drove 9 miles to give it a try. Keep in mind I have a dry cleaner 4 doors down from my house. After driving out of my way, I found out they won’t accept women’s shirts because they don’t fit the ironing machine. Is this my fault? The sign has been in the window for seven years. Am I the only one to complain?

What are your promises to your customers? Do you stand by your products, willing to repair them forever? You don’t have to offer free repairs, but what are you saying about your product if you abandon the customer who wants to keep using it? All I want is a guarantee that you’re going to be there to talk with me and give me guidance.

My car is a 1998 two-door Lexus with 198,000 miles. When I take it in, no one says it’s too old to be repaired. Is a car different? I think from now on I should ask, how long before you stop talking to me?

Customers don’t want everything for free. We just want to know that someone will stand behind their purchase and at least talk with them if there’s a problem.

Maybe I have unrealistic expectations. But before I buy something “pricey” with a lifetime warranty, I’m going to ask, “Whose lifetime?”

Lisbeth Calandrino has been providing customer service and sales solutions to businesses for the past twenty years. To have her train or speak at your business, contact her at Lcalandrino@nycap.rr.com or 518.495.5380.

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Customer Service is not about Technology, It’s About Keeping Up With the Customer

23 January 2014 Categories: Blog, Customer Service

It’s not about technology; it’s about the customer and how the customer is getting information.

Yesterday I receive a  call from a floor covering retailer about technology.

“I just can’t keep up with it, he said, I don’t know what to do first!”

This is a common cry from business owners who believe that technology is the key to their existence.  They think if they don’t learn everything about it, their business will fail.

Yes technology is changing every day, but that’s not the problem. The problem is finding your consumer.  The consumer  has  found new friends in cyberspace. Instead of starting their product search in your retail store; they are starting their search online. To  keep your business alive; you must know the following two things:

  1. Who is your primary customer? No, not everyone is a customer. Your customer should be profitable and should want to sing your praises. (This customer is probably a referral.)
  2. Where online does your customer hang out? (Everyone has their favorite places to connect.)

Your customer may still be at the Chamber of Commerce or at the Networking Group, but they are also online. To keep up with your customers, you will need to know their favorite haunts. Why spend all of your days on Facebook chasing down a customer and then realize they’re on LinkedIn?

Google has been writing about the Customer’s Zero Moments of Truth, ZMOT to give us an idea of what’s fueling the customer. Instead of telling us “what technology to use” they are telling us to find our customer. I have linked you to an article I wrote for the Albany Times Union on the ZMOT.

Three ideas from  Google are worth significant attention. When it comes to the customer, Google suggests the following: Here is a video link to ZMOThttp://v1.zeromomentoftruth.com/google-zmot-es.pdf.

  1. Know where your customer hangs out and show up to engage.
  2. Show up often. (Don’t be a stranger or ‘one-hit wonder.’ hit wonder.’
  3. Know what to say when you show up.

If your primary business is B-to-B, then LinkedIn might be the place to show up. What will you show up for? Note the above. Either join a group connected with your industry and the people you want to know. If there isn’t a group, start your own.

If your primary business is retail, check out Facebook, Pinterest and Houzz. If you’re not sure which ones apply to your customers, ask them.

Let’s stop kidding ourselves. Most searches start on-line. Our job is to decide where our customers are on-line and meet them there. This is where the dance begins.  The idea is to get the customer to engage with you so get to know and trust you. Once this happens they will consider going to your retail store.

Today engagement is all about listening to, and talking with the customer. The days of “telling the customer anything” are over.

Lisbeth has been coaching businesses for over 25 years. Her focus is helping businesses use customer service to impact the bottom line. Not sure where to begin? Give Lisbeth a call and share your thoughts. Lcalandrino@nycap.rr.com or 518-495-5380.

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Success Is Not All About You

12 January 2014 Categories: Blog, Motivation

Success is about everyone.

Many of us grew up wanting to conquer the world. We didn’t want partners; we just needed challenges.

There’s a point where you realize that true success is when the team achieves success and everyone gets what they want.  Unfortunately, there are many who don’t want to share success, they want it all for themselves. As a “mostly” only child, my sister was six years younger than me. I always felt I was the star.  My parents doted on me and everything I did was wonderful. My one good quality as a kid was that I shared my toys until my sister came along.

 

Many of us are “self-starters’ or entrepreneurs. The good news is we “can do it by ourselves,” the bad news is we only want to do it alone. The key is to recognize that it’s a lot easier and quicker if we join forces with others. We also have the opportunity to learn from others and improve our “vision” of the world.

How do we make it happen? First, we have to realize that every employee brings different skills and attitudes. It doesn’t mean everyone is great, but together they can shine and  produce something awesome.  It’s like being the team captain and loving the results.

How do you build a great team?

If you’re the team captain, forget about all those well-rounded employees. It’s doubtful that you have them. Instead look at everyone’s strong points and figure out how to use each of their skills. Maybe some people have considerable interpersonal skills and get along with everyone. Some people have great attitudes. Support those with the skills and help them get better. Make sure you find something that works for each of them.

Know your goals and what you’re trying to achieve. Give each person a spot and help them succeed. Some people need more support and praise then others—give it to them.

Maybe its attitude, or interpersonal skills, or teamwork, or a specific skill set… whatever it is, that attribute is the foundation for individual employees and for your team. Training can fill in the gaps, but this is the attribute almost every employee must possess.

Look at your puzzle. Can you take weaker people and help them achieve and shine? Long term it’s a lot less work if you can get others to do it for you. Once they have their maiden voyage, they will get better. I worked with a group that decided to create a cookbook for their customers. The first year it was so much work that several times the leader wanted to tell all of them to leave it alone, and she would do it. The next year it was like “a walk through the park” as they say. Everyone knew who they could depend on and what each person was capable of doing. Now they’re working on the third year and they are getting incredibly creative. Everyone learned from this event, especially the manager who was able to continue her work while everyone found their place. For some interesting ways to motivate your employees, check out how to motivate employees.

Lisbeth A. Calandrino is a high energy inspirational speaker who brings practical ideas that can immediate applied to the workplace. She combines real life stories and cutting edge strategies to support organizational change. To motivate your organization, Lisbeth can be reached at lcalandrino@nycap.rr.com

 

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