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Want to be Successful? You’ll have to do your own Pushups

“You can’t hire someone else to do your push-ups for you.” Amen. Like your physical training program, you must take responsibility for your own mentoring program if you expect to gain anything from it.

Nobody wants to hear this but becoming a success takes work—lots of it. It also takes a lot of follow through which most people don’t like to hear either. If you pay attention to both, it’s likely you will be able to accomplish what you want.

These are really simple rules, so why don’t we “just do it?”

Many people talk about being rich but when you look at what they’re doing, you know it won’t make them any money. Most likely, they know that too. To get rich you have to invest your money before you spend it.  According to what I’ve read, most people have habits that cause them to fail financially. My mom used to say it’s a simple formula: you need to spend less than you make. Then you will have some left over to invest. I know this is a tough one; there are so many things to spend your money on with new things coming out every day.

If you want to be successful, you will have to spend lots of extra hours working at your trade. You need to ask yourself, do I have the gumption to keep at it and give up other things? It seems that both success and financial freedom require giving up something in the present to get what you want in the future. You will have to endure names like “workaholic, cheapskate and other unflattering descriptions. You must be willing to take consistent action and get out of your comfort zone. Dreaming will not get you much except maybe a good night’s sleep. You must take your dreams and turn them into actionable items.

I was listening to a friend of mine talk about her illnesses; most of which are fictional. Yes, she has a bad back but who doesn’t? She has been told to take Yoga and water aerobics to stretch her tight muscles.  She continues to go from doctor to doctor to get some sympathy and the magic pill. Why doesn’t she just do the work? She won’t because effort is out of her comfort zone. Her middle name should be “the easy way out.”

We’re all guilty of looking for short cuts. I have a friend who won’t train his dog to learn simple commands. He doesn’t care if the dog jumps on you, nips at your hand (he taught the dog to play rough) or doesn’t come when his name is called. (Of course he doesn’t know his name, why should he come?).  His owner is unwilling to do the work to socialize or make his dog successful.   Maybe it sounds silly when I say “successful” when talking about the dog, but he needs certain skills to live in society. One wrong move and he will be back in a shelter and considered not adoptable.

If you want results, you will have to take action. You can’t let things happen to you or say, “I’m not lucky.”

The sad thing about all of this is that we are all destined to become successful but only a small portion of us will make it.

Some of you are cuter, richer and smarter but not of this guarantees success.

You need to do the right things to get the results you’re after. How will you find out what you should be doing? The best thing is to learn from someone who is successful. Once you know how they did it, just apply the same strategies. At l least, it will put you on the right road. You may not get it exact the first time, but few successful people do. Just get a plan and keep at it.

I hate the expression “no pain, no gain” but it’s probably so. Be willing to sacrifice and you will get the rewards.

And like I said, you’ll have to do your own pushups.

Lisbeth Calandrino has been doing training and  mentoring for over 30 years. Join her in Panama City, FL for two days of workshops: sign up at http://www.mohawkuniversity.com/2DayPanamaCitySeminar2014.aspx

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By |June 20th, 2014|0 Comments

How “Social” is Your Business, Really?

 

Social media is social by nature. It is about developing relationships and rapport with customers and potential customers. By doing this the sale will come eventually. And that sale will also come with brand loyalty and support for life.

Business are scurrying to set up social media pages, just like they did with websites when they became all the rage. They know they need them, but unfortunately, all too many don’t know why. They believe that simply having a social media page is enough.

Big deal, so you have a bunch of likes. It doesn’t take much to like a page; all it takes is one click of a finger. It’s not a suicide pact, it’s just a click.

Social media has turned into the next savior, and businesses are so desperate to “modernize” that they’ll even have their fourteen year olds set up their accounts for them. But, then they complain that they don’t work and are a waste of time.

See the Value of Establishing Your Business’ Social Presence

If you’re not social offline, it’s doubtful you will be social online. Not being social online is instant death. Social media is set up for conversation and interaction.

Sadly, businesses are too busy to maintain their social presence; they say they have “bigger fish to fry.”  They’re too busy setting up booths at local trade shows, sending direct mail post cards, running ads in the newspaper and ignoring the online chatter.

They also choose to believe that because they don’t use social media their customers don’t either. We have a tendency to project our reality on everyone around us. We believe, or want to believe, that everyone thinks like we do.

My hunch is that if you use Facebook, you know others who use it, and if you don’t, you prefer to believe they don’t. By the way, both are true: Some do and some don’t, but according to Forrester Research, 81% of people who have a computer use social media in some form of another.

Social Media and Reputation Management

If you are a B to B company, you have fewer customers than a retail business and the relationships need to be managed. The B to B purchase is a highly considered purchase; it’s not like going to the supermarket.

Before a company changes to a new supplier, they want to know everything about them – including their reputation. All of this can be done online. If you choose not to show who you are online it’s your loss.

Social media demands a new level of cooperation between the marketing and sales department. No matter what you sell, you have to know what everyone is doing in the marketplace. Salespeople need to share with marketing what people are saying, what they’re buying and why their buying. Your brand is constantly being exposed to social media and is likely to be searched on social media if marketing is doing their job.

Social media is about humanizing businesses and people. Kinship and stories drive customers. Everyone wants to know about everyone else. If you want to develop bonds that drive customers to your business, you will have to build some transparency into your business and “get social.”

Lisbeth Calandrino has been providing business coaching for businesses for the past twenty years.  Her new book, “50 Events to Drive Traffic to Your Store” will be available on Amazon in June 2014. To have Lisbeth to provide training in your store, reach her at Lcalandrino@nycap.rr.com or 518-495-5380. Join Lisbeth in Panama City FL, for two days of “jammed” with sales techniques. http://www.mohawkuniversity.com/2DayPanamaCitySeminar2014.aspx.

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By |June 8th, 2014|0 Comments

Strategies are Nice but Results are Better

According to Nunes and Dreze, the head start loyalty card helped customers mentally reframe the completion process; the fact that they didn’t have to start something from scratch played a huge role in their motivation to complete the card.

Everyone says customer retention is a critical part of their business, but few actually follow through. Customers who continue to come back and refer friends are better than any advertisement you could run in your local newspaper.  Unfortunately, most businesses are focused on new acquisition and usually ignore customer retention.

Here is an interesting statistic on customer retention:

According to Bain and Co., a 10 percent increase in customer retention results in a 30% increase in the value of the company.  Wow, only 10%?

How will you get your customer retention moving forward? Here are a few strategies to make it happen.

Stay connected to sold customers. This can be done with newsletters, special officers and events. You know the expression: out of sight out of mind. A happy customer is likely to refer a friend.

Find ways to reward your sold customers– often. The other day I saw an ad for my cable carrier; the introductory price for new customers was really cheap. It’s a lot lower than what I’m paying. What do I have to do, opt out and go back in as a new customer?

Customer service is a marketing function. Marketing should look at all of their programs and make sure they are staying focused on sold customer. It’s been written that poor customer service accounts for 70 percent of customer loss. Customer service strategies should be pervasive throughout the entire company not just sales and customer service staff. Typically poor customer retention stems from bad leadership. If the owner doesn’t think, it’s important, why would anyone else? Customer service should be an ongoing conversation.

Quit talking and start listening! Try to tune into what your customers are saying daily.   This way, you can stop problems before they begin.

I was buying paint at The Local Paint Store this morning. Lyle, the paint maven, told me not to worry about the age of my paint; as long as the paint wasn’t frozen it would still work. Wow, I said, I thought I would have to throw it out.

The paint maven said, “It looks and smells good to me!”  I didn’t know the smell had anything to do with it; nice to know that someone cares about my pocketbook.

We are in the “participation economy: and we need to take our service to another level and constantly look for ways to be innovative. Consider finding ways to bring your customers together so they can share experiences with one another.

Lisbeth Calandrino has been providing business coaching for businesses for the past twenty years.  Her new book, “50 Events to Drive Traffic to Your Store” will be available on Amazon in June 2014. To have Lisbeth to provide training in your store, reach her at Lcalandrino@nycap.rr.com or 518-495-5380.

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By |May 30th, 2014|0 Comments

Don’t Let Your Customers Get Away From You And Other Bad Business Practices

 

Set a better mousetrap for your customers.

Set a better mousetrap for your customers.

I was listening to an interesting discussion about the “casual dining” groups of restaurants the other day, i.e. Red Lobster and Olive Garden just to refresh your memory.  Is it surprising to learn they’re losing business?  When was the last time you couldn’t wait to go to Olive Garden?

Things have changed but it doesn’t seem like they noticed.

 It  appears that people are dining out less; they’re also dining in different places. 

The millenniums aren’t really interested in going to their “grandmother’s restaurant,” think about it. They also are eating less and are looking for what they consider “healthier food.”

Red Lobster has changed the outside of the building, added  a canopy and moved the bar closer to the entrance. Still business continues to spiral down. Of course, I hear the lines to Red Lobster in certain parts of the country, Florida, for instance, are still unbelievable. It’s still not enough business. Personally, I am appalled by the lobsters in the tank by the cash register.

Casual dining in general has been hit by the economy. It’s no longer fast and the food hasn’t changed for years.  

Where is everyone going? They’re going to “fast casual restaurants ” lead by Panera’s. The perception of Panera’s is healthy, faster and customizable food. If you don’t want potato chips, you can have an apple with your ½ sandwiches and soup or salad. You can use their WIF; we know their left-over bread, and pastries go to the food Pantry.  MyPaneras’  club lets you know when they’re holding events, having tastings and offer baking tips.  

What does this mean to your business?

If your business has been around for a long time, like our “casual restaurants” have, you should know the latest trends that might affect your business.  It’s not hard to pay attention to  your customers and the trends; you just have to ask them.  

The casual diners are jumping ship and going to places like Chipotle where the look and the place is different.  How did they miss it?  You can’t sit around and do nothing while the world is changing and expect to thrive.     

You need to check out the trends. Your next customer is the Millenniums; they think differently and want distinct things. They also want everything done fast.   You can only live on your old customers so long before they disappear. Once this happens, it may be too late to change.  

Survey your customers, the new ones.  Ask them where they’re hanging out and why, what do they think about retail and what changes would they like? I’ve mentioned before that my grocery store recently put in a “wellness center.” This is definitely something “out of the box.”

Survey the customers whom you’ve lost. The average business loses 10% of its customers yearly. If our “casual dining restaurants” had done some interviewing they would have learned interesting things for their business.

Get to know your customers.Apparently Target has built a mathematical model to predict when its female customers are going to give birth!. Maybe you don’t know your customers that well but by doing surveys and holding events for your customers you will get to know them better. Hold events in your store that will make your customer feel like they belong.

The best thing a business can do is find ways to get emotionally involved with their customers. This doesn’t mean marrying them, but almost.

Lisbeth Calandrino has been providing business coaching for businesses for the past twenty years.  Her new book, “50 Events to Drive Traffic to Your Store” will be available on Amazon in June 2014. To have Lisbeth to provide training in your store, reach her at Lcalandrino@nycap.rr.com or 518-495-5380.

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By |May 18th, 2014|0 Comments

7 Ways to Deal With Customer Complaints

Every business exists for their customers.

Dealing with customers is really an art. Dealing with customer complaints is even more difficult. There are certain rules that apply that will help you, and make your customers feel better. Happy customers should be part of your customer retention strategies.

Dealing with complaints effectively will help improve your reputation. Every company has problems, being good at handling them will go a long way in keeping customers.

  1. Acknowledge the customer’s anger. While you’re listening to the customer, write down their concerns. Writing will keep your focus and help you remember  what the customer is saying.  It will also give you more  time to think about a solution.
  2. Thank the customer for their complaint. Have you ever heard that a complaint is a gift?  Instead of trying to explain away the problem, assume the customer has a valid point and thank them for sharing it with you. Unless you know what’s bothering them, how will you fix it?
  3. Empathize with the customer. Understanding the customer’s problem doesn’t mean you agree with them. It’s just good to be heard without interruption.
  4. Don’t be afraid to say you will look into it. Not everything can be solved immediately. Tell the customer you will get back to them and give them a date and a time. Being consistent with your word will go a long way.
  5. Learn how to apologize. You’ll be surprised how apologizing will change the customer’s attitude. Telling someone you’re sorry also acknowledges that you realize that what happened is a problem for the person. Think about it; what’s better than a sincere apology?
  6. If they’re yelling at you and blaming you personally, try to stay calm. Reassure the customer you will get on it and will come up with some solutions. Just because they say it’s your fault doesn’t mean it’s so!
  7. The last thing to do is to act. You don’t have to take responsibility for the problem, but you can take responsibility for getting something done.

Lisbeth Calandrino has been helping businesses to build loyal customers for the last twenty years. To have her speak to your company or schedule a consultation, reach her at Lcalandrino@nycap.rr.com or check out her web site, www.lisbethcalandrino.com.

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By |May 8th, 2014|0 Comments

Want to Improve Your Bottom Line? Hold Events in Your Store

Proven ideas to drive customers to your business.

I was speaking with a friend of mind that owns a culinary store. “It must have been a tough winter, with all the snow,” I said.

“It was a great winter she said. We started holding cooking classes, and we were swamped.”

I mention her success because holding events has   always been a winner. No matter what your retail store, thoughtful promotions will attract new customers and thank your old ones. Holding events also creates a “buzz” that will have your neighbors paying attention. It doesn’t have to cost much money. It just takes some thoughtful promotions; don’t be  afraid to go all out. The more people you can bring in the better. The purpose of an event is to get people into your store and get to know them. Since 85% of your business is probably referrals, you don’t want customers to forget you.

Anything you do that pleases the customer improves your customer service. The more interesting the customer experience the more the customer will remember you. Customers have so many places to hide online that reaching them  has never been more difficult.

Making people feel special is cheap. Don’t you love getting an invitation to an event even if you can’t attend? It means that someone is thinking about you.

We’re all looking for things to do that aren’t expensive.

Events don’t have to be related to your products. For many retailers not promoting their products seems to be frightening. They’re afraid if they don’t talk about their products, they will lose customers. Actually just having fun with your customers is a way to build relationships. Even though we know it’s a good way to build sales, retailers seem reluctant to hold them.

My advice, “Get over it.”

  1. You shouldn’t spend a lot of money. Having lots of balloons will create a party atmosphere and putting your event on your social media will get the word out. It’s not necessary to advertise in the local newspaper unless you have extra dough. These days social media can do it all for you.
  2. You don’t need a big space. Hold your event during your off season. During the holidays, their is lots of competition for your customer’s attention. With the summer coming, this is a perfect time to have a garden seminar in your parking lot. If you’re a risk taker, have a barbecue at your house. Several years ago, I had a fund-raiser at my house, and it was fun and people just loved coming to my home.
  3. Customer appreciation day always works. David Campbell, owner of Amazing Toys in Great Falls, Montana, holds a customer appreciation in October before the holidays. He also gives reduced prices at his events for Christmas shopping. (Click on the link for information on how to hold a customer appreciation day. )
  4. Have you held an Anniversary party? Why not celebrate your business and share it with your customers.
  5. How about a special “guest” appearance? Every town has local celebrities. Some even have worldwide celebrities. Maybe you can have them make a special appearance. If you can involve a local not-for-profit, you will have a better chance of getting a celebrity to  your business. I remember when we raised money for the special needs program  in our neighborhood; we didn’t have any problems getting Yankee great Phil Razzioto to make an appearance! It was so exciting.

Holding events is the way to bring in customer and build relationships. If you need ideas for events, check out my recently published book, “50 Events to drive Traffic to Your Store.” It will soon be on my website and on Amazon.

Are you attending “Coverings” this coming week? If so, stop into my seminar on “How to Use Events to Grow Your Business” on Friday May 2, 2014, at 9:30-11 A.M.

Lisbeth has been a retail consultant for over 20 years. She specializes in improving customer service and building sales strategies that drive traffic. To have her speak at your store, she can be reached at 518-495-538-.

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By |April 27th, 2014|0 Comments

5 Simple Ways to Get Customers to Hate You

Have procedures for the common problems.

It’s hard to get customers to hate you, but companies manage to do it.  The other day I was at Best Buy returning my computer monitor. One day while working at my computer,   I heard a “pop” and the screen went dark. The monitor  was less than a year-old, and I didn’t know if I had a warranty. I thought I would just take it back to Best Buy. I’ve bought alot of things at Best Buy and always found them to be accommodating; slow but accommodating.

Upon arriving at Best Buy and getting in the “Geeks” line, I’m asked if I have a reservation. (Table by the window?)

I reply “No” and am given a number. I’m the next one in line, so I’m not too worried. The woman  continues to ask everyone behind me the same question but instead of giving them a number, she decides to solve their problems. Now the fifteen minutes turns into thirty.

What’s annoying about this whole thing, is that she’s also the “problem solver!” Another  half-hour goes by and  she sends me to a “Geek” who is annoyed because I don’t have the cord for my monitor.

“Isn’t this  cord store I ask?” Of course, he doesn’t laugh but tells me the cord is unusual, and he will have to go look for it. Fifteen minutes later he comes back without the cord. I suggest I buy one and then return it after he looks at the monitor! Good idea right? I guess not.  Okay so one hour later they tell me I am entitled to a new monitor. Maybe we could have started there and we  could have eliminated the cord stuff.

They finally give me a new monitor; not before they take the cord out of the box!

They weren’t busy they were just inefficient.

Here’s my list:

  1. Don’t ask the customer about their problems. Just assume you know everything and don’t include them in the conversation.
  2. Don’t smile; smiling might make you friendly, and we don’t want any of that.
  3. Share your problems with the customer. I could have cared less about his cord problem. Remember, they are the “cord store” and the “Geeks.”
  4. Don’t make eye contact with the customer. Again, why would you want to be friendly? You might lose if the customer thinks you like them.
  5. Don’t have procedures for your common problems. In this case, a simple “when did you buy this” would have eliminated the cord nonsense.

Common problems are ones that occur frequently.  You can make everyone happier, including yourself if you have the answers to them.

Lisbeth Calandrino has been doing sales training and helping businesses build loyal customers for over 20 years. To have her speak at your business, give her a call at 518-495-5380.

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By |April 21st, 2014|0 Comments

5 Things You Can Do To Stop Hiring “Dead Beat Employees”

Bad employees ruin your culture.

When I go out to train, owners often tell me their employees don’t really care about the business. Somehow or other, it’s the employees fault. Frankly, I think not .Every time you hire someone who is not good, the entire organization suffers. Bad hires not only create customer ill will, but they effect the people who must work with them and manage them.

Or do they? We know if I have a stake in something I will pay more attention. How much do you share with your employees? There are plenty of reasons why they don’t care as much as you would like them to. Here are some ideas for you.

First, you need to hire right.

Don’t get desperate and hire anyone with a pulse!

You know the old saying, “be slow to hire and quick to fire” has some merit. Unfortunately, most businesses hire when they’re desperate. It’s like going into the supermarket when you’re hungry. Everything looks good. Hiring someone is not easy but consider someone who fits into your culture and is up to date. I am thinking that hiring the old guy with the 1980’s suit and attitude is done. You need people who understand social media and can help you build your business. The first question I would ask is “how many Facebook friends do you have and do you have a LinkedIn profile?” You will know immediately if he gets it.

What is your culture like? Is it laid back or is it fast paced? It matters you know.
2. Be clear with you goals. If goals aren’t measurable how will they get done? Many businesses don’t set goals with their employees; no wonder nothing gets done. People have to know where they stand and what’s expected of them. Furthermore, having goals builds self-esteem. You want your employees to get better. What do you expect from your employee and state it’s so it’s measurable?
3. Manage by walking around. This was what Bernie Marcus and Arthur Blank were famous for—the original owners of The Home Depot. They would show up in the stores, walk around and thank employees. If there were problems, after the walk, they would note their comments and send them back to the store manager. Too often this is missing in this day and age. Remember you get what you inspect. If you haven’t reach “Built From Scratch” the Home Depot story, you’re in for a treat.
4. Let your employees know what it takes to run your business.  Let your employees know the overhead, and how much you need to take in before you make a profit. Profit sharing programs really work. If all an employee sees is money coming in, it gives them an unrealistic idea of what business is all about.

5. Incentives work. Not everyone responds to money. If you want to know what motivates your employees you will have to ask them. An unscheduled day off during good weather might be worth its weight in gold.

Lisbeth Calandrino helps businesses  develop profitable sales opportunities that will impact a company’s bottom line. To have her speak at your business or develop a custom training program, reach her at Lcalandrino@nycap.rr.com.

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By |April 14th, 2014|0 Comments

Let Me Tell You How To Do This, Managing The Customer Experience

Happy customer rock. 85% will leave because of bad service and never come back. Can you afford to lose them?

It seems like every day new customer frustrations arise; I swear I never hear about the amazing customer service stories anymore. Frankly, I don’t think there are that many in the naked city.

A friend was telling me about her experience with ordering new glasses. The place: a national chain. The customer: a no-nonsense, tell-it-like-it-is personality, but very nice.

In the course of the transaction, the salesperson owed her 10 cents change. The salesperson remarked to my friend that she didn’t have the right change – in other words, no 10 cents. The frustrated salesperson didn’t seem to have anything else to say, so my friend decided to jump in and help her out.

“So,” she asked, “what do we do about my 10 cents?” This seemed like a logical customer question.

The salesperson replied, “I really don’t know what to do.”

Thinking it might be helpful to offer another scenario to the salesperson, my friend asked, “If the difference was 50 dollars what would you do?”

Her thought process: Maybe the numbers were too small. Why didn’t the salesperson just offer to give her the 25 cents back? This seemed to be even more upsetting, so the salesperson said she was calling the manager.

Now my friend was starting to feel uncomfortable. Why couldn’t she just have her quarter back and then start over? The salesperson told the manager she was upset and didn’t know how to fix the problem.

The manager replied, “I have a headache, so why don’t you give the customer the quarter back, and let’s be done with this?” The salesperson again told the manager how upset she was. The manager replied that, if she was that upset, she should go home.

At this point, my friend had had enough, so she decided to add her two cents. “It’s not the 10 cents or the quarter, why do we have to go through this for me to get my change? All she had to do was give me the quarter back and you would have been 15 cents short.” This met with a look of distain from both the salesperson and the manager, and my friend was really feeling like the bad guy and maybe even a little nuts.

She continued explaining to me: “All I was trying to do was to show the salesperson that it wasn’t that difficult; she just needed to think. I was beginning to realize that I was probably not welcome in the store, and I was beginning to look like a crazy customer—all over 10 cents! Again I tried to explain, it’s not the 10 cents it’s the principle. Damn, I didn’t need the change anyway. It was best I got out of there before I caught a headache.”

The big customer question: Why didn’t the salesperson know what to do? Couldn’t she have looked for a dime in her purse? Hadn’t that happened before?

Shouldn’t a store train their salespeople on common problems, i.e. making change?

 

I know you probably think this is a made up story, but why make up stories when the real ones are so great?

 

Lisbeth Calandrino has been helping businesses managing the customer’s experience for over 20 years. To have her work with your employees or speak at your business she can be reached through her email, Lcalandrino@nycap.rr.com or 518-495-5380, EST.

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By |April 1st, 2014|0 Comments

Will Your Salespeople Make The Cut?

Salesperson must be knowledgeable about people.

The new millennium has brought numerous changes that are affecting your business and your sales. Many of these we could have never predicted, which makes them even more intrusive. We have entered a new age of selling and a way to do business. Selling, marketing and buying seem to have melded together. What used to be our competitive advantages are slowly eradicating making businesses vulnerable.
With change comes conflict and opportunity. For global organizations this will continue to intensify and shrink as markets get larger.
If your’ organization is engaged in sales, and who isn’t, these changes will call for an overhaul of your sales force and their duties. Those stores that make the cut will survive those that don’t will fall behind their competitors and eventually fall off the radar screen. In order to make changes in your selling system, here are some trends that simply can’t be ignored.
# 1. Never forget that customers are smarter than ever.
This is the age of the customer not the age of technology. The consumer has disrupted how we do business and how they want to relate to your salesperson. By the time the customer gets to your store, she is more than 50% though the buying process and has a pretty good idea how to solve her own problem. This means your selling system has to change.

#2. Selling is quicker than ever.
This is because consumer’s expectations are increasing and out of hand. If your business can’t keep up the pace, you’re off the grid. Customers know about new products and what’s changing in your world. Your job is to keep up and learn more—quickly.
#3. It’s becoming impossible to have the better mousetrap.
We used to talk about competitive advantage; it’s harder than ever to keep one for very long. Instead, your company needs to be imaginative.

According to Peggy Noonan in a 2011 Forbes Article, “Why Businesses Die“, she notes that half a century ago the life expectancy of a firm in the Fortune 500 was around 75 years. Now it’s less than 15 years and declining even further. How long do brilliant ideas last? About 15 nano seconds!

#4. Look out, generation Y is on the move.
By 2025, the majority of the workforce will be these tech-savvy workers who not only think differently than your veteran sales force but interact differently. Combining them with your present workforce will present challenges. Training will be more important than ever especially team building for this inharmonious grouping.

Consider scheduling some team building.
#5 Start planning to make your business a destination, or you will be history.
Shopping is not what is used to be; by 2025, 50 % of the malls will be closed. Only those that come up with a new reason to exist will make it. Jose de Jesus Legaspi and his Plaza Fiesta Malls has changed the malls into a destination for Hispanic families. His malls contain great food, doctors and dental services and entertainment.
How will you make it? Future success will be predicated on rethinking how your organization functions—and making serious changes. Some of these changes will have to be radical. Over the next few weeks, I will talk about what might be on the horizon for you.

Lisbeth Calandrino helps business build Loyal Customers through Customer Retention Sales and Marketing. To have her speak at your business, call her at 518.495.5380, EST.

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By |March 26th, 2014|0 Comments