Want it to Work? You Better do it Your Way

15 March 2012 Categories: Blog, Motivation

The other night at the Alliance Flooring Convention I was struck with a statement made by  keynote speaker Dale (“the Murph”) Murphy. Dale was a major league baseball player for 18 years.  Dale said there was a time when he was playing so badly that he thought he should quit. It didn’t matter what he did or how much coaching he got, he couldn’t seem to improve. It occurred to him if he quit he knew what would happen; he would never play baseball again. If he stayed, he still had an opportunity, and so he stayed.

I haven’t stopped thinking about his statement; how do we  know when to quit? Quitting is the  end to whatever we’re doing.  In this case  quitting meant the end of the pain and it also meant being out of the game.  According to Murphy,  if success is what you want, quitting is never an option.  So Murphy didn’t quit but another person may have quit even if they wanted  the game.

Why do some people quit and some stay? It appears that it has to do with motivation.

 Some people quit exercising, dieting and their marriages. Others stay around for what’s called “the long haul.” Could it be there are different types of motivation? There are people who listen to motivational speakers, get all reved up and go home and do nothing.  There are others who get reved up and go home and do everything. So what’ the difference?

My research leads me to two types of motivation, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation. . Simply, internal and external motivation. People who have extrinsic motivation need rewards from the outside to stay around. Cheering crowds, big pay checks, constant bonuses and the big hurrahs.

Those with intrinsic motivation are  motivated from within. They are motivated by their values and mission and find it difficult to quit.  If you are truly living your passion, quitting is not an option.

I am often asked to come in and motivate the salespeople.  My response is always I really don’t have that kind of magic, what I can do is help people find out what’s important to them. What makes them tick., why they come  to work and  what’s important in their lives–the internal motivation. I tell them everyone has something that shapes their world and gives them a reason to exist. Unfortunately people often find  out what it is and it’s not selling. What do they do–up and quit.

Unfortunately people don’t always have the luxury to do what they want or even have the time to figure it out. Author Henry David Thoreau said it best when he said,  “Most men lead lives of quiet desperation and go  the  grave with the song still in them.”

In other words, you have to be able to help people find their own values and their own purpose.  The reason people fail or quit is because the payoff isn’t really what they want. The payoff is what someone else thinks is important or what someone else wants. That’s why value’s clarification exercises are valuable to a company.

So how do you motivate yourself?

 You must decide what’s important to you and what you can commit to no matter what the external payoff. 

You must want to be you no matter what.

You must believe what you do is  worth the struggle.. As Frank Sinatra sang,  I Did It My Way.”

How do you motivate salespeople, and why do sales jobs have such high turnover? Sales is usually about extrinsic motivation, the pay off, the dollars. Eventually it doesn’t matter and people get bored and quit or the money isn’t enough. If you’re looking for great salespeople look for those that are motivated by caring and helping customers get the right products. Salespeople that want to do the right thing for the customer and never give up.

By the way,  Murphy finally ended up in the outfield where he became the youngest player in history to win back-to-back MVP awards (1982 and 1983), was named to the National League All-Star team seven times.

Lisbeth Calandrino is a motivational speaker and coach. She can be reached at Lcalandrino@nycap.rr.com.

 

 

 

 

 

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7 Responses to “Want it to Work? You Better do it Your Way”

  1. Rick Noel 15 March 2012 at 1:17 pm (PERMALINK)

    Great post and premise Lisbeth. Passion is required and top of the list for intrinsic motivation, which in turn is huge for the long haul. I find that focus is a close 2nd in terms of required traits for success. Great story about Dale Murphy, especially at the end when the pay off is there in a big way. Fortitude is never easy and “actually doing” is always harder than thinking about or dreaming about doing. Thanks for sharing.

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  2. Caren 15 March 2012 at 10:01 pm (PERMALINK)

    Great post Lis! There is an interesting study conducted by a company that specializes in assessment tools that reinforces the idea that attitude far outweighs behavior when it comes to sales success. Using the DISC behavioral model, there is no one behavioral tendency that produces top performing salespeople. However, when measuring what motivates us or compels us to action, top salespeople have a strong “Utilitarian” attitude. This means they are motivated by money and surpassing others in wealth. They are practical and undertake activities in which they know the return on their investment of time, energy or money.

    The sales organizations I’ve worked with, where I’ve conducted DISC and Motivators assessments, reinforce the research. The top salespeople differ in their behavioral tendencies but all tended to show a high Utilitarian attitude.

    Thought this may be of interest to you and your readers! Keep up the great posts!!

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  3. Lisbeth Calandrino 16 March 2012 at 4:45 pm (PERMALINK)

    Hi Rick, Thank you so much for taking the time to comment.

    I think the “long haul” is the ticket as well as focus. Its been said that “consistency is better than good salesmanship.” Consistency with all of the things that pay off such as focus. Dale Murphy was quite interesting, he couldn’t stress enough his inability to get better no matter how much advice and training he got. He finally found is niche in the outfield and it made all the difference. I asked him if it was really true (the not being able to get better) and he replied “more than you can imagine.”

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  4. Tom Boschwitz 18 March 2012 at 12:34 am (PERMALINK)

    Dear Lis,

    Winning in life is a choice in good times and tough times. The Dale Murphys of this world wake up everyday thinking “I guess all we can do is win.” And they do!

    Lis, you are as always an inspiration!

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  5. Lisbeth Calandrino 25 March 2012 at 8:25 pm (PERMALINK)

    Thank you Tom; I like your statment, “I guess all we can do is win!

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  6. essays 30 March 2012 at 11:26 am (PERMALINK)

    great) liked everything very much) keep it up and dont stop)

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  7. Lisbeth Calandrino 10 October 2012 at 7:51 pm (PERMALINK)

    Thanks so much; I seem to be lax in replying. I apologize.

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