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Quiet I recently found out it was better to eat the French fries at McDonalds for 230 calories and 11 grams of fat than eat a chicken crisp sandwich for 360 calories with 28 grams of fat. Who would have guessed?

Is this a good thing?

As a consumer isn’t it better to have all the information and make your own decision than have someone make it for you?

Does the vendor lose? I chose the French fries because I’m hungry and they taste wonderful and are ½ the price of the chicken crisp sandwich. By the way, I feel good on both counts. But McDonald’s loses because I spend less money.

Maybe they really don’t lose; before I was just ‘not informed’. Buyer beware, eat at your own risk! Now I feel like I’ve been duped. Actually I doubt the people that worked at McDonalds were worried about the calories, they were more worried about their jobs.
I wonder if the owners thought about it, what do you think? I bet they’re not happy about the calorie counts.

What types of warrantees do you have that you don’t discuss with your customers? As a flooring inspector customers often tell me, "nobody told me that."  I often wonder, did the salesperson really omit that the carpet should be vacuumed, cleaned, seams aren’t invisible or the carpet will shed? Were they afraid if they told the customer they wouldn’t buy? How about their flooring warrantees? Is it still only one year when many of the responsible retailers give lifetime warrantees. Warren Buffet wrote a letter to the shareholders and explained that he had lost millions by acting slowly on closing the trading arm of Gen Re, Berkshire Hathaway's wholly owned subsidiary. I doubt if Warren will be fired for his honesty since he controls a majority state of Berkshire Hathaway.
Why not tell the customers and deal with the customers concerns before the job is done and the customers are really upset? As customers we are responsible for what we buy but isn’t the salesperson obliged to help us with our concerns or bring up issues that are unfamiliar to us?

A great salesperson let’s customers know their options and gives the good news and the bad news so the customer can choose what’s best for them. We need less help if we buy a newspaper than a sofa although it would be nice to know that the ink from some newspapers comes off on your hands and clothing. I think the next time I buy a newspaper and the ink gets all over my face and hands I will go back and demand a refund.

How about this problem. I purchased a suede jacket in the airport at The Spirit of the Red Horse. If you’ve been there you know they have great looking and expensive clothes. The inside of my jacket said, ‘dry clean only’ so when it got dirty I took it to the dry cleaners. My local cleaner refused to clean it because of the ‘bead work.’ So the next time I went to New York City I brought the jacket and asked the same question. Guess what, after three dry cleaners I realized it wasn’t getting cleaned. No one wanted the liability. Should I have known? I think so. Would I have bought it, I don’t know. I would have thought at least twice before deciding. I finally called the store, and after several managers one finally said send it in, no problem we’ll clean it for you. It has been 4 months, no jacket and no word. I faxed them a letter last week requesting my money, a new jacket or the clean old one. I received a call and was told the manager was on vacation. You know the end of this tale, they can’t clean the jacket.

What would the tag have said? Maybe "Buy at your own risk — you figure out how to clean it we can’t." I guess as consumers we should read the fine print and if there isn’t any we should make it up.

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